What do I write?

Since the semester ended a couple of weeks ago I have been wondering, what should I write about on my next blog. I am not confined by the terms that were set forth (sounds official) by my professor. In short, I can write whatever the hell I want! To be faithful to the #grumpykid I will keep it family related, and promise NOT to dredge in current events unless of course they enter into our daily life, highly unlikely, but you never know.

Since I like brief blog posts, I will adhere to the KISS philosophy. Keep It Simple Stupid.

Dealing with defiant children. Every kid hates rules and the consequences of rule breaking. Now throw in the impulsiveness of ADHD and it’s a whole new ballgame. I am dealing with that now. I’m at a loss on how to handle it, I just don’t know. Crying your eyes out to a psychologist over the phone doesn’t help, yelling doesn’t help, taking away electronic devices doesn’t help. This morning while laying in bed a promoted post popped up in my feed. “The  6 Toughest ADHD Discipline Dilemmas – Solved!” I was like HELL YA, FACEBOOK HAS SOLVED ALL MY PROBLEMS.

http://www.additudemag.com/slideshow/100/print.html

I read it, pretty interesting. Check it out, and let me know your thoughts. I have no quick fix, I don’t even have a suggestion. Like I said, I just don’t know but we will keep moving forward.

 

 

What do I write?

NVLD…

A lot of my attention has been on ADHD and how it has affected our family. Often ADHD is not the only factor; there are often other issues that walk together hand in hand. In our case, Non Verbal Learning Disability (NVLD) and Dysgraphia are our ADHD’s partners.

NVLD is a sneaky little sucker. It can be masked and misdiagnosed as Asperger’s or even Autism spectrum disorders because it has a lot of the same outward appearances. The most common being: poor social skills, formal talk with friends, and repetitive behavior/rigid routines, just to name a few. Thorough testing is a must to identify the disorder. I understand that hindsight is 20/20, but a big sign of Bobby’s NVLD occurred about a year or so back.

When we moved into our home, Bobby was a year old, and his room was painted light blue. Recently we painted his room dark blue and red, think the colors of the American Flag, with broad stripes across one wall, see photo below. He couldn’t sleep for a week, and I could not understand why. I did not discuss the change with him and at the time, we weren’t aware of the NVLD at the time. Children with NVLD are highly anxious when there is a drastic change in their environment. Some more than others, Bobby is a little more laid back than some, but this huge change was a doozy. We are planning on lofting his bed and are awaiting the package. But this time, he has been included in all the planning stages and will help to put together the bed when it arrives. Keeping your child in the loop when you plan on changing their environment is crucial in keeping the frustrations and outbursts at bay.

The light blue stripes are the original color of the wall.

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NVLD…

NVLD…

A lot of my attention has been on ADHD and how it has affected our family. Often ADHD is not the only factor; there are often other issues that walk together hand in hand. In our case, Non Verbal Learning Disability (NVLD) and Dysgraphia are our ADHD’s partners.
NVLD is a sneaky little sucker. It can be masked and misdiagnosed as Asperger’s or even Autism spectrum disorders because it has a lot of the same outward appearances. The most common being: poor social skills, formal talk with friends, and repetitive behavior/rigid routines, just to name a few. Thorough testing is a must to identify the disorder. I understand that hindsight is 20/20, but a big sign of Bobby’s NVLD occurred about a year or so back.
When we moved into our home, Bobby was a year old, and his room was painted light blue. Recently we painted his room dark blue and red, think the colors of the American Flag, with broad stripes across one wall, see photo below. He couldn’t sleep for a week, and I could not understand why. I did not discuss the change with him and at the time, we weren’t aware of the NVLD at the time. Children with NVLD are highly anxious when there is a drastic change in their environment. Some more than others, Bobby is a little more laid back than some, but this huge change was a doozy. We are planning on lofting his bed and are awaiting the package. But this time, he has been included in all the planning stages and will help to put together the bed when it arrives. Keeping your child in the loop when you plan on changing their environment is crucial in keeping the frustrations and outbursts at bay.
The light blue stripes are the original color of the wall.

NVLD…

#dailystruggle

I love my son to the moon and back, but some days, I just want to look him straight in the eye and say, WHAT THE HELL WERE YOU THINKING?!?

When we first started carpooling to the new school way back when, there was a little brown haired girl, “S”. She is sweet, talkative, and sometimes too smart for her own good. Little man was smitten and fell hard. Apparently in the first few encounters with the little brown haired girl, he told her he was 12 years old. He’s 10, and will be turning 11, June 19th. So, when he and I discussed the topic about birthday parties, he announced he would NOT be having a party. I was very disappointed. In the past, we have had two parties, and neither one broke any records for attendance. If there were five kids there out of the 20+ we invited, we were lucky. But I felt this year would be different!  New school, lots of friends, he was going to make out like a bandit.

While talking to the little brown haired girls mom, I mentioned that Bobby does not want a party. I asked, “What freaking 10-year-old doesn’t want a party?” The little brown haired girl’s mom asked, “how old is he?” I told her ten.  It was then we realized that Robert lied about his age to the brown haired girl. And again, “What 10-year-old lies about their age?”

This is symptomatic of children diagnosed with ADHD. The lying about things that seem ridiculous to you and me. I blame the poor impulse control, BUT it’s not an excuse. I did take into consideration that he did not actively think about it for days and days and then thought, “Oh I’m going to lie about my age.” I did believe when the opportunity presented itself for him to appear to be equal to the little girl he had a crush on he took the reins and CARPE DIEM!!

Unfortunately another symptom of ADHD is the inability to manage emotions, and when the truth finally did rear its ugly little head, he was devastated and had a hard time coping. We talked about it at length, and he let me know that “they are working it out.”

Thank God, I was worried…..

#dailystruggle